Psychology


The Plight of an Artist

The plight of an artist Bleeds stripes of passion. Across the back of a scarred soul, Where self-medication takes its guilt-ridden toll, The soul of an artist curves Like a beam of light At the edge of a black hole Bending reality With hungry arms And a thirsty tongue Suckling deep At the breast of a lover’s song.   The …Continue reading →

“Ode” by William Wordsworth

This is one of my favorite stanzas (V) from Wordsworth’s romanticized poem, better known as “Ode: Intimations of Immortality from Recollections of Early Childhood.” This poetic paragraph takes for granted a biblical (or Platonic) pre-existence, which mourns the loss of a child’s vision of an ideal world fading away “into the light of common day,” in what feels like a …Continue reading →

Justice, Righteousness, and Shalom: An Interpretive Virtue Ethic of Isaiah 32:16-17 for the Whole Community

When we live the way we are supposed to God is glorified and we are blessed or happy (shalom). The biblical view of happiness is cultivated by living according to biblical virtues, such as justice and righteousness, which are motivated by flourishing (shalom). In this paper, I explore the prophet Isaiah’s prognostication in Isaiah 32:16-17 of not only human flourishing …Continue reading →

Back to Being!

In our fast-paced modern world, pride can disguise itself as busyness or even success. I am not talking about healthy responsibility. I am referring to taking on more and more stress until there is no time for spontaneity, enjoyment, and rest. We shove God off His throne and replace Him as the center of the universe. We think to ourselves …Continue reading →

“A MORE FULFILLED LIFE”?

In Rubén Darío’s poem, “Los Motivos Del Lobo” (“The Motives of the Wolf”), St. Francis of Assisi converts a wolf into being civilized but only temporarily does the feral canine stop the slaughter of animals and humans in the hills of an Italian town, Gubbio. At first the wolf conforms to the ways of the community enjoying its peace. But …Continue reading →

Omnisubjectivity and Passibility

Click on the link below to read about the relationship between what Linda Zagzebski has doctrinally described as a divine attribute, omnisubjectivity,  and what it means for God to change in his emotions. Omnisubjectivity and Passibility

Introduction to Biblical Ethics Podcast

The heart of God is for human flourishing. Episode 3, Intro to Biblical Ethics

“Introduction” to BIBLICAL ETHICS: An Exegetical Approach to the Morality of Happiness

IDEAS have consequences. For example, the invention and devastation of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, during World War II, started with an idea of atomic fission. Likewise, beliefs have consequences. For example, the Columbine school massacre on April 20, 1999, the 110th anniversary of Adolph Hitler’s birthday, was in part the result of one of the shooter’s …Continue reading →

“Preface” to BIBLICAL ETHICS Podcast

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“Preface” to my book, BIBLICAL ETHICS: An Exegetical Approach to the Morality of Happiness

WHEN WE LIVE the way we are supposed to God is glorified and we are blessed (happy)! Sadly, most modern Christians take issue with the notion that happiness is for the here-and-now, delaying it for the afterlife. Too often we gorge ourselves on an ethical diet of doing the “right thing” out of a sense of duty while our taste …Continue reading →

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